Archive for the 'Boquete birds' Category

Boquete Garden Inn’s Breakfast with the Birds: Clay-Coloured Thrush

The Clay-Coloured Thrush is the bully of the Boquete Garden Inn bird feeder. Drunk on power and yesterday’s fermented fruit, he lurches from statue to statue, hopping and stomping on everybody’s breakfast, sending chunks of banana, pineapple and papaya flying to the ground. When one of the smaller birds attempts to share the feeder with the thrush, he chases them off with an urgent chirp, flap of wings and indignant flash of eyes.

Fittingly, his Latin name is Turdus grayi, or, as I call him, Little Turd.

Clay-Coloured Thrush at Boquete Garden Inn's Breakfast with the Birds

Clay-Coloured Thrush at Boquete Garden Inn’s Breakfast with the Birds

He is the national bird of Costa Rica, which always baffles guests: why choose such a plain bird to be your country’s avian representative, especially when you have so many glitzy specimens to choose from?

A few reasons: The Yigüirro, as he’s called in Costa Rica, tends to live close by, in gardens and near people, so he’s a familiar, friendly little face featured in many Costa Rican folk tales and songs. The males also have a pretty tune they sing when trying to woo ladybirds during mating season. Traditionally, Costa Rican farmers listened for this song of longing – considering it to be the first sign of rainy season.

Boquete Garden Inn: The perfect place to stay for birding in Boquete Panama! Join the Clay-Coloured Thrush for Boquete Garden Inn’s Breakfast with the Birds (gaining in popularity among humans and birds alike!) And don’t worry: he’s actually quite friendly with people.

Boquete Birds rate Boquete Garden Inn ‘Best Breakfast’

Boquete Garden Inn’s breakfast is not only delicious – it attracts the most beautiful birds in Boquete. Even now, after seven years, the daily ritual of placing the fruit on the statues and watching the birds snap to attention is happy-making: The bird calls change. Feathers are extra fluttery. The squirrels start twitching. And then the dance begins.

Here is the beautiful Mr. and Mrs. Red-Legged Honeycreeper–regular visitors to Boquete Garden Inn’s breakfast. Top rated with birders who visit Boquete. Top rated with Boquete birds!

Male Red-Legged Honeycreeper at Boquete Garden Inn

Male Red-Legged Honeycreeper at Boquete Garden Inn

Female Red-Legged Honeycreeper at Boquete Garden Inn

Female Red-Legged Honeycreeper – Boquete Garden Inn


Photos by Mark Wangerin.

Birds of Panama: the Summer Tanager in Boquete

summer tanager

This beautiful fella is a Summer Tanager. But wait! He, along with some other birds of his genus, are no longer part of the Tanager family: they’ve been re-classified, and are now part of the Cardinal family. (But he still goes by Tanager. He’s not partial to hyphenated last names). Confused? Don’t worry. All you have to know is that he is gorgeous and he is currently enjoying his ‘Breakfast with the Birds” gig at Boquete Garden Inn (the best place to spot the birds of Panama!)

Boquete Hiking Trails – The Waterfall Trail (aka Pipeline Trail)

I take this Boquete hiking trail most Sundays with my wonderful animal stalker friends, Bill and Lynne. The Waterfall Trail in Boquete is gently sloped, so not too strenuous and it delivers on stunning views and an abundance of wildlife. This Boquete hiking trail is also the Quetzal nightclub of Boquete: all the boy quetzals gather here, coyly letting their tail feathers swing, luring in the ladybirds. Finding this trail can often be confusing: it used to be called the Pipeline Trail, plus, there’s another excellent trail close by with a similar name, The Lost Waterfalls (our next featured trail – stay tuned!). You know you’ve got the correct trail if you see this sign:

waterfall trail entrance

This is the trail we recommend most often when guests ask us where to go. For plenty of reasons:

Quetzals! You have the greatest chance of spotting a Quetzal on this Boquete hiking trail. You further increase your odds if you have a skilled guide with you. We can arrange this at check in. Most tours pick up at the hotel at 8:00-8:30 a.m. or 1:30 p.m. and the hike lasts about 3.5 hours. The cost is approximately $40 per person.

Quetzal on the Waterfall Trail, August 2014. Photo courtesy of John from Boquete Custom Tours!

Quetzal on the Waterfall Trail, August 2014. Photo courtesy of John from Boquete Custom Tours.

The Really Old Tree: Yes, that’s the official name of the 1,400 year old tree that has withstood two eruptions of Volcan Baru (you can see two distinct indentations in the trunk). The tree is off to the left of the main trail (not the first left fork at the beginning of the trail…that’s where the bee colony is. Don’t go there). You’ll see the tree from the main trail. You’ll also see a lot of people with binoculars pressed to their faces, mouths slightly ajar hovering in the vicinity – it’s prime quetzal country due to the abundance of aguacatillos, also called mini-avacados, or, quetzal crack cocaine.

The Waterfall! At the end of the trail, you’ll see a stunning waterfall. Tip: Don’t stand directly under the water, trying to recreate an Irish Spring moment. Landslides/tumble-y rocks a distinct possibility, especially in rainy season. Admire from a distance.

waterfall

Wildlife: I’ve seen quetzales, toucanettes (you’re picturing a toucan in a blonde wig and smurf hat, aren’t you?), howler monkeys, a sloth, baby tinamou (he hiked with me for a spell). Lynne and Bill have seen: the above, plus, a weasel, peccary, coatimundi, armadillo, deer, olingo, cacomistle, porcupine, opossum, agouti, capuchin monkey.

Photo courtesy of Bill Fox!

Photo courtesy of Bill Fox!

Another two Bill photos!

Another Bill photo!

armadillo

The drive up to the trail: The Bajo Mono loop road is spectacular. You can make a whole day of it: stop at the crazy rock formation, waterfalls, abandoned ‘castle’, stop in at Fresas Cafe for a fresa batido (strawberry milkshake), drive through farm country and breathe in the smell of green onions. We provide a great map with all the landmarks. Ask us about it before you hit the road and we can give you some tips!

You'll see this on the way up to Bajo Mono.  Climbers not guaranteed. :)

You’ll see this on the way up to Bajo Mono.Climbers not guaranteed.

Safety first! This trail features a lovely woman named Janeth who collects $3 from each hiker to cross her family’s land. She also takes note of who enters the trail and who exits—which is always a good thing.

Trail: The Waterfall Trail
Location: Up the Bajo Mono loop road – ask at our front desk for a map!
Time: 2 – 3 hours (depends on how often you stop to shoot photos)
Pros: Beautiful views, quetzals and other wildlife, waterfall
Cons: Lots of people on it in high season
Level: Beginner/intermediate

New Bird Spotted at Boquete Garden Inn

Cheeky the Squirrel raids the bird feeder.

Cheeky the Squirrel raids the bird feeder.

The birds aren’t the only creatures who enjoy ‘Breakfast with the Birds’. This fella routinely ambushes feeding time, packing in as much fruit as he can and then taking off. The Boquete Garden Inn birds are fighting back. Bird species on the offensive: Clay Robin and The Great Kiskadee (not surprising). Don’t worry: the birds are winning!

Bird species we routinely see at breakfast:
- Blue Gray Tanager
- Flame Tanager
- Palm Tanager
- Red Legged Honeycreeper
- Passerini’s Tanager
..and so much more.

Boquete Garden Inn is top-rated with birders (and birds!).

Palm Tanager

Palm Tanager at Boquete Garden Inn

Palm Tanager at Boquete Garden Inn

The Palm Tanager, a frequent visitor and nester at Boquete Garden Inn. He’ll make the odd appearance at the Boquete Garden breakfast, alongside Passerini’s Tanager and Blue Gray Tanager, but generally likes to keep to himself. Favourite fruit: Papaya.